HISTORY

THE WORLD HISTORY OF THE CANNABIS

Mankind does not live in a vacuum. Our story is intertwined with the stories of countless other species, and when we make these plants and animals for a part of our lives, we always change our way and our life course. If we understand their stories, we will be able to explain it more easily.

There is no plant that would have such a wrapped relationship with humanity as cannabis. An unusual story about cannabis offers more futile unraveling in parallel with the human story; instead, it runs in a zigzag through our path, it sometimes completely disappears and appears when you least expect it and often from a completely new direction. As it is appropriate, it begins at the very beginning.

CHINA

Cannabis was probably developed in Central Asia, where it was one of the first plants grown by fiber. For cotton from India and a flax from the Mediterranean, it was not known for the first time only 1000 years later. Cannabis was one of the threads that, at this stage of civilization, brought together communities. Humans have already domestied cultures (and also cannabis) that gave them food, but hemp offered them the material that was perfect for the skills that were being taught. Masses were looking for substances for all their clothes from cannabis; only the wealthy could afford the luxuries of silk. Hemp and mulberry (food silkworms) were so important and widespread that it became the >> land of mulberry and cannabis << synonymous with China.

The plethora of evidence from graves and other sites throughout China speaks of the persistent cultivation of Asian cannabis ever since prehistoric times. In the 12,000-year-old Neolithic site discovered in Yuan-Shan (in present-day Taiwan), remnants of simple, sandy pots were found, whose patterns were embellished with patterns of hemp strips, along with engraved stone punchers Thoroughly hemp. In the late Neolithic site (around 4000 BC) in the province of Zheijang, evidence of fabrics made of cannabis and silk was found. When they were excavated at the site of Shang (1400-1100 BC) near the Taixi village in the province of Hebei, remnants of cannabis weaving works, some pieces of burned hemp fabric, and 13 pieces of torn hemp cloth were discovered.

More than 1000 funeral items were discovered in the Chou cemetery near HsinTs'un near An-Yang. In addition to gold, silk, lacquer and other valuable items, hemp products are also on the list.

The innermost cross was made of wooden boards reinforced with honeycomb clamps, which were fastened to the coffin with a varnish. The tomb of the late Western Chou Dynasty, discovered in the Shaanxi province, contained bronze vessels, weapons, jade, pots and a densely embroidered piece of cannabis. In other graves of the Chou dynasty, they excavated bronze objects, which were protected by silk and cannabis wrapped around the envelope.

Sometimes old books are the best archaeologists and some offer a glimpse of the role of cannabis in ancient China. Shu Ching (around 2300 BC) says that the land of Shantung Province is "whitish and rich ... with silk, cannabis, lead, pine trees and unusual stones ..." and that the inhabitants of the Henan Valley paid their taxes to their rulers in hemp.

More than 1000 funeral items were discovered in the Chou cemetery near HsinTs'un near An-Yang. In addition to gold, silk, lacquer and other valuable items, hemp products are also on the list.

The innermost cross was made of wooden boards reinforced with honeycomb clamps, which were fastened to the coffin with a varnish. The tomb of the late Western Chou Dynasty, discovered in the Shaanxi province, contained bronze vessels, weapons, jade, pots and a densely embroidered piece of cannabis. In other graves of the Chou dynasty, they excavated bronze objects, which were protected by silk and cannabis wrapped around the envelope.

 Armade military leaders were protected by clasps that were sewn with hemp bands, and cannon bowls made out of cannon thus exceeded the bamboo that they had used before to decide a lot of battles. Cannabis was planted around every noble castle in order to consolidate the land.

 

The earliest pharmacy book we know of, Pen-Ts'ao Ching, was made in the 1st or 2nd century BC from even older excerpts attributed to the legendary Emperor Shen Nung (around 2300 BC). ). The book mentions that cannabis "grows around rivers and valleys at T'aishan, but you can see it now." «

Shih Ching (Book of), a collection of 305 songs and psalms, stacked between 1000 and 500 BC. n. no. He mentions thirteen times millet, twenty times a marsh and seven times hemp. In the first dictionary of the Shuo-ewn chieh-tzu, formed by Hsu Shen in the period of the Eastern Han, four versions of the word ma (hemp) appear. Chi-chiu-pen, an alphabet, compiled in the 1st century BC n. No. in order to teach him writing and reading, he lists rice, millet and cannabis in one sentence.

These early books limited the weight and volume of wooden and bamboo writing boards and the price of a rare, silky proto paper zhi. During the Han dynasty (207-220 BC), they discovered that they could have a writing surface if they rolled them and diminished along with the mullet's crust. The history of the dynasty, Hou-Han Shu, puts the invention of paper into the 105th year. and attributed it to Marisa Cai Lun, chief of craftsmen during the reign of Emperor Hei Dy. Archaeologists discovered old hemp samples from the period of western and eastern Hana in Xinjiang, inner Mongolia and Shaanxi, so Cai Lun, in all likelihood, only controlled the craftsmen who made the paper, and at the same time spread a good voice about him during the imperial office. As the chapter 108 in Hou-Han Shuju says, "he demonstrated the process to the Emperor in the first year of Yuan-Hsing and praised his abilities. They used paper everywhere. "

Some archaeological discoveries are supported by the written testimonies of Hou-Han Shuja. The excavation of the collapsed guard tower in Tsarkhortei provided us with a specimen of paper that was created at the time of Cai Lun. Other important finds were discovered in 1974 in a tomb in the province of Kansu. The excavated cuts of cannabis were attached in three layers and wooden strips to the sides of the cart with a wagon. Perhaps the oldest existing copies of paper, made centuries before Cai Lun, were discovered in a tomb near Xian in the province of Shaanxi. The tomb and objects are not younger than the reign of Wu Dhi of the Western Han Dynasty (140-87 BC). An excerpt from Confucius' Lun Yuja (Analects), written on whitewashed paper in 716 AD, was found at the cemetery at Tirfan in the province of Sinkiang. The same site was provided by a beautiful pair of hemp shoes that were sewn with hemp threads. In 770, cannabis again helped humanity to take the next step - the printing of the first book, Dharani, a collection of prayer on paper that was made only of cannabis.

Hemp paper is flexible, strong, sophisticated and waterproof, and thanks to these characteristics it was appreciated and used for official documents, books and calligraphy. In Hsin Thang Shu, it is said that the Chin Dynasty Court advocated for every month the scholars of the Academy of Dignitaries collected with five thousand pieces of hemp paper. From the hemp paper they worked in I-Chou (now Sichuan), all books in the Imperial Library were made in the Khai-Kuan period (713 - 742 BC).

Archaeologists also discovered several pieces of honeycomb paper from ancient Korea, including a thick, strong, whitened and glittering piece of chi-lin china (paper from the kingdom of Silla). This was in the duty-laden list of China, which scholars appreciated it for exceptional quality. Fei Fu Yu Lueh writes that also Ming's artist Tung Chi Chang was painting on chi-lin chih. The cannabis is widely reported in Fan Sheng-chih shuju, a discussion on farming, written by Fan Sheng-chih around 25 BC. The hemp seed was first treated with soaking in the beet of ground horse bones, limiting , silkworm and sheep manure. Although Nan-Ch'i shu, the history of the Southern Ch'i dynasty (from 470 to 502 BC) mentions the pulp of cannabis seed, the use of cannabis seeds for food by the 6th century has seen a significant decline. Over time, it was replaced by cereals that did not contain so much fat, and in the main, they forgot about its nutritional value. Chinese farmers also made hemp seed from their hemp seed for their clothes.

Cannabis also occurs in the history of Chinese medicine. The famous doctor Hua Tuo (from 141 to 208 BC) invented ma-yo (cannabis wine) and ma-fei-san (hemp-hemp powder), which he worked from cannabis and limiting, and used for anesthetics during their operations. The Pen T'sao medical manual ranks me between yin (women, chu-ma) and yang (male, i-ma) substances. Cesar Shen Nung ranked chu among the supreme elixir of immortality and advised the Chinese to grow only female plants because of their great advantages for medicine. The indoor label between the Zhou dynasty (from 770 to 220 BC) demanded that guests include a maiden among the ritual gifts. During the Qi dynasty (from 479 to 502 BC), the removal of flowering male plants from cannabis was a spectacular public rite.

The unique hemp fiber is the core of the essence of the Chinese culture of making lacquered containers. Chinese lacquer is made from tree juice (the Rhus verniciferas tree), which is passed through a piece of hemp material to clean it. Then it is heated and mixed to homogenize and thicken, then apply it through the core of the hemp fiber. The excavation of the grave of the early western Hanans at Lao-fu-shan in the province of Kiansi brought more than 200 grave additions, including seventy-colored objects, including some winged glasses on the sheets of hemped goods.

In the 9th century, the envoy from the land of the barbarians (Indochina) brought the emperor as a gift fabric, which argued that it is made from purified water smelling cannabis. Courtiers are described as shiny and bright, who won the men with their sweet scent. This overflow and five colors has been more charming and prettier than brocade from our central provinces.

  Source: Great book of cannabis

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